Uganda

Through radio programs of all types, from music, to Bible studies, to counseling, Words of Hope Uganda is claiming all assets of Ugandan society and culture for Christ.

Uganda is a hard place. Though Christianity is popular in this country, extreme poverty and lack of education make it nearly impossible for churches to adequately disciple those who are coming to know Jesus. Words of Hope’s Ugandan Director explains that while many are born into the faith, they often starve spiritually because no support structure is in place for their growth. Nominal Christianity is common. In fact, many Ugandans who self-identify as Christians simply know that they are not Muslim.

Lack of proper education and discipleship allows Ugandans to be swept up into false wealth-gospel belief systems. Many also mix older tribal religions with Christianity in their search for truth. With the support of generous donors, Words of Hope’s is empowering Ugandan pastors and churches to effectively nurture their people in the life of Christian discipleship. In the midst of this hard place, radio is bringing truly life-changing good news.

“Since you began this program, we feel that we learn more about God than before. These other preachers just tell us how to get what we want, but you have given us what we need to know so that we can grow.

Languages

In the Acholiland region of Northern Uganda, the native language is Acholi. Although school children learn English, Acholi is still considered their heart language. Many older people only understand Acholi. The programs aim to provide hope and counsel for those suffering the spiritual and emotional aftermath of war, in addition to supplying practical biblical instruction for those who are illiterate.

Target Area: North Uganda, South Sudan
Broadcasters: Beatrice Anena Tabu
Partners: Church of Uganda
Diocese: Northern Uganda Diocese (Gulu)
Transmission Site: Favor FM
Times: Three 30-minute programs per week

The Alur people subsist primarily from agriculture, growing millet, cassava, spinach, pumpkins, maize and sweet potatoes. The 460,000 Alur people are scattered throughout districts of Northern Uganda, and also live across the border in Congo.

Target Area: West Uganda
Broadcasters: Henry Luke Orombi, Samuel Oyirwoth
Partners: Church of Uganda
Diocese: Nebbi Diocese
Transmission Site: Paidha FM
Times: Two 30-minute programs per week

Bari-Kakwa people live in northwestern Uganda, as well as in South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. They grow corn, millet, and potatoes. When a popular local Ugandan station began airing Words of Hope’s Bari-Kakwa broadcasts, the radio station noticed tremendous audience response. Since then, additional stations in the region have offered free air time for the programs. Crediting the positive impact of the Bari-Kakwa broadcasts, church leaders have noted an increase in weekly worship attendance. Some churches have even expanded the number of Sunday services they offer. The Bari-Kakwa broadcasts are aired four times each week, highlighted by a live call-in program on Saturday evening.

Target Area: Uganda, South Sudan
Broadcasters: Mark Augustine Sebit
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: Yei Diocese (South Sudan)
Transmission Site: Spirit FM – Yei
Times: Four 30-minute programs per week

Bari-Kuku is a language spoken by the Kuku people mainly the in Kayunga District of Uganda. Others are found in the districts of Luweero, Nakasongola, Bombo, and Kampala, and in South Sudan. They have never heard their language on the radio. The radio has helped many to hear the Gospel for the first time, receive faith in Christ, and even moved Bari-Kuku people to work toward translating the Bible into their own language. The program has also helped Bari-Kuku people find each other, as most are scattered around the country without knowing others of their own people group.

Target Area: Uganda, South Sudan
Broadcasters: Julius Iga, Emmanuel Bugga
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: Mukono Diocese (Kayunga), Kajo-Keji Diocese (South Sudan)
Transmission Site: Spirit FM – Kampala, Voice of Kajo-Keji FM
Times: Two 30-minute programs per week

The devastation of the Idi Amin and Milton Obote years with its unrestrained terror, murder, tribal warfare, and corruption destroyed much of the economic and social fabric of the nation and hastened the spread of AIDS,” reports Operation World. Although the threat of internal fighting by terror groups and robber gangs has subsided, full recovery and complete healing will take many years.

Target Area: Uganda
Broadcasters: Charity Tumukunde
Partners: Church of Uganda
Diocese: Mukono Diocese, Kampala Diocese
Transmission Site: Spirit FM
Times: Four 30-minute programs per week

Most of the 230,000 Sabiny people live in Kapchorwa District, a mountainous region in Eastern Uganda. The region has fertile soil, and many of the Sabiny people make a living raising cattle and cultivating beans, wheat, corn, and potatoes. They sell their produce when they are able, but poor roads and mountainous terrain make it difficult for them to bring their produce to the market. More than 60% of the Sabiny people live in poverty.

Target Area: Uganda
Broadcasters: Keren Chalengat
Partners: Church of Uganda
Diocese: Sebei Diocese (Kapchorwa)
Transmission Site: Elgon FM – Kapchorwa

Words of Hope Uganda was established in 2006 as a partnership involving the Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University and Words of Hope. Luganda is a common language in Uganda. Bishop Stephen Kaziimba serves as Chairman of the Words of Hope Uganda Management Committee. His impoverished Mityana Diocese extends across a wide area. Words of Hope enables him to speak to his people every Sunday morning by radio, bringing them encouragement from the Word of God. Stephen is responsible for 500 churches and requests prayers and assistance in providing training for pastors and other workers. Church leaders increasingly view the partnership as a strategic opportunity to enhance and enlarge the Kingdom throughout East Africa.

Target Area: Uganda
Broadcasters: Jennifer Katendeke Ssagala, Joshua Ssali
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: Mityana Diocese, Mukono Diocese, Namirembe Diocese
Transmission Site: Sun FM – Mityana, Namirembe FM
Times: Four 30-minute programs per week

Mbale Diocese in Eastern Uganda bordering Kenya has provided for the addition of a new broadcast in the Lumasaaba language spoken by about two million people. This typifies the long-range expansion strategy that Words of Hope Uganda is pursuing. Where applicable, these diocesan partnership include field-based program production in a widely spoken local language.

Target Area: East Uganda, Western Kenya
Broadcasters: Rev. Israel Muhofa
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: Mbale Diocese
Transmission Site: Elgon FM Mbale
Times: One 30-minute program per week

Northern Uganda was the operational area of the so-called Lord’s Resistance Army. This violent guerrilla group conducted a campaign of terror against local people, including rape, murder, and the kidnapping of children. The result was destroyed communities and hundreds of thousands of displaced people. For now, the conflict has ended, and people are returning to their homes.

Target Area: North Uganda
Broadcasters: Rev. David Okello
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Transmission Site: Unity FM
Times: One 30-minute program per week

Target Area: Uganda
Broadcasters: Rev. Simpson Tukamuhabwa B.
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: Kinkiizi Diocese (Kanungu)
Transmission Site: Kinkiizi Broadcasting Service (KBS FM)

Rwenzori Diocese was formed in 1960 by the division of the Diocese of Uganda. It is one of the oldest dioceses in Uganda. It is famous for its annual renewal conference, which attracts over 1000 people from various parts of the country. Rwenzori Diocese seems to stand out in the Province of the Church of Uganda as the leader in their annual commitment to the Renewal Ministry Conferences to ignite supporters in the power of the Holy Spirit. The western diocese of South Rwenzori airs daily Words of Hope broadcasts in the Rukonzo language over the diocese-owned Messiah FM station.

Target Area: West Uganda, Eastern Congo
Broadcasters: Aeneas Kato
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: South Rwenzori Diocese (Kasese)
Transmission Site: Messiah 97.5 FM
Times: Two 30-minute programs per week

The Rutooro language is spoken by the Toro people group who live in Western Uganda. Toro people typically exchange lengthy spoken greetings with each other. It is considered culturally rude to merely say “hello” in passing. The type of greeting that is appropriate in a situation varies depending on gender, age, and other variables. Toro people are also assigned nicknames, or empaako, at ceremonies held shortly after birth. The empaako is chosen by elders of the tribe and carries a specific meaning, such as “intelligent” or “caring.”

Target Area: Uganda
Broadcasters: John Muhenda
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: Rwenzori Diocese (Fort Portal)
Transmission Site: Kabarole Research Centre (KRC FM)
Times: One program per week

The Runyoro language is tonal in nature, meaning that the tone of voice used often determines the level of politeness and the actual meaning of an expression. As tone ascends, the words spoken are considered to be less and less polite, which means that the majority of Runyoro speaking people talk in lower, softer voices.

Target Area: Northwestern Uganda
Broadcasters: Morris Kusiima
Partners: Church of Uganda, Uganda Christian University
Diocese: Masindi Kitara Diocese
Transmission Site: Kings Broadcasting Service (KBS FM)
Times: One program per week