The Fall of Egypt

READ : Ezekiel 29-32 Throughout its later history, Israel was caught between two major world powers, Egypt, to its southwest and to its northeast first Assyria, then Babylon, and finally Persia. At this time, Babylon is pressing hard upon Judah, and the temptation is to trust in Egypt rather than in God. This section shows that Egypt was a poor ally, and will fall before Babylon. It looks to the secular historian that little Israel is in the hands of …

Lord of the Nations

READ : Ezekiel 25–28 While the message of the prophets was primarily addressed to their own people, they also had a message regarding other nations, for they knew that their God was sovereign over the whole world. The prevalent idea of the time was that each nation was ruled by a different god, but the prophets knew there was only one God, who controlled all nations. Ammon, Moab, Edom, and Philistia had rejoiced at Judah’s downfall at the hands of …

God Our Husband

READ : Ezekiel 22–24 Having named and condemned the sins of Jerusalem once again, God compares Jerusalem and Samaria, the capitals of Judah and Israel respectively, with two sisters. They were God’s “wife” so to speak, but they both behaved like prostitutes. They should have had an exclusive relationship to God, but instead they built intimate relationships with other nations in whom they put their trust along with idols. This was a matter of spiritual adultery which would lead to …

History of God and His People

READ : Ezekiel 20–21 The elders come to Ezekiel inquiring of the Lord, but instead of giving them an answer, he gives them a history lesson and recounts the way God dealt graciously with Israel, despite how Israel responded with unfaithfulness. This approach, recounting the history of God’s dealing with his people, is very common in the Bible. We should consider the history of the church. God called into being the church. He built it upon the foundation of Christ. …

Two Eagles and a Lioness

READ : Ezekiel 17-19 Ezekiel is given a riddle by the Lord. An eagle representing Babylon came to a cedar tree and took the top twig representing Jehoiachin, king of Judah, and carried it away. He then takes Zedekiah and plants him and he becomes a vine. The vine then turns to a second eagle, Egypt, and in doing so breaks his covenant with Babylon. God is so opposed to someone not keeping a covenant that he will punish Zedekiah …