Lord of Lords and King of Kings

READ : Revelation 16–19 Seven angels pour the wrath of God upon a world which dares to persecute Christians. The harlot represents Rome, the city of the seven hills (17:9). One after another of her emperors persecute Christians, but they will be defeated by Christ “for he is Lord of lords and King of kings” (17:14). One may have to pay a great price to be on the side of Christ, but in the end it will pay; therefore be …

The Enemies of God's People

READ : Revelation 12–15 Here we have a new vision in which the woman represents God’s people (first Israel, then the church). The child represents Jesus. The dragon represents the devil. The devil tries to pounce upon Jesus, but he ascends to heaven. The devil then turns his attention to the church which is protected by God. An ally of the devil is the beast from the sea (13:1). Rome is across the sea from Turkey, so this beast apparently …

God Punishes a Sinful World

READ : Revelation 8–11 The world dared to persecute faithful Christians. God in heaven will not let this go on forever. He will pour out his wrath upon such a world. When the seventh seal of the scroll that only Christ can open is loosened, seven angels blow their trumpets, and as they do God punishes the world in ways similar to the plagues on Egypt. The message is: although it seems prudent to deny your faith to save yourself …

Christ Can Do It

READ : Revelation 4-7 To understand Revelation we must realize that in terms of its type of literature it is mostly a form of writing called apocalyptic. Narrative writing, such as the description of what Christ did as found in the Gospels, must be taken literally. But apocalyptic literature must not be taken literally, although it must be taken seriously. It consists of visual descriptions which are meant to stir the whole person, rather than simply the mind. It uses …

Strength for Suffering

READ : Revelation 1–3 There are three basic ways to interpret the book of Revelation, and devout Christians differ by holding each position. One is the futurist view, in which most of the book deals with events near the end of the world. Another is the historic view, which sees the book as a prediction of events throughout history. The third is the preterist view, which holds that most of the book deals with what would happen shortly after the …